History #20 – Early February 2002, discharged to home: End to pineapple legs and thigh-high stockings.

March 29, 2007 at 6:44 am | Posted in chemo side effects, chemotherapy, family, Karen Oxner, My initial treatment -- induction, Sam Cantin, Terry Timmons, TNT | Leave a comment

I began my post-discharge life at home in this way: Along with the aforementioned pineapple fluid filled legs and ironic weight gain, I was given diuretics and other treatments to reduce the fluid. I was encouraged to keep my legs on pillows, preferably above the level of my heart to minimize any further swelling. They also gave me something that I had encountered in my clinical nursing career working with the elderly, to wear. When I went to bed, I was to put on a pair of TED hose. These stockings went up my thighs, and compressed the flesh on my legs in an attempt to remove fluid from them.

Any of you reading this who have to wear them, I apologize in advance, but having worked with elderly patients with TED hose I must admit made me feel even more like an invalid. Each night I’d go through a routine of pulling, stretching, and tugging these hose over my legs. It was about a fifteen-minute process. I could recall many times when working with patients doing the same for them while putting my own on. While in the morning I could see a bit of a decrease in size, the concept of it all was a bit humiliating and demoralizing.

Otherwise, much was similar to the previous experience at home in early January before the most recent hospitalization, which I talked about in earlier posts. I was still taking chemotherapy, and by white blood count was still down. This meant the threat of infection was still there, so the high temperature watch and constant threat of needing to return to the hospital for more IV antibiotics was still there. All of the food (no cheese, yogurt, fresh fruit and veggies) and household restrictions (no houseplant dirt and kitty litter removal – sorry Sam) were still in effect. And I still had to wear the HEPA filter mask when outside. And the bathroom problems previously discussed were still occurring.

One positive thing about this time period was my sister Karen had come out for an extended stay to help out with me, and help Sam with the household duties. She had come a few days before discharge almost immediately after my brother Terry had left (I think they might have overlapped; some of that time was when I was struggling with amphoterrible episodes, so I don’t remember exactly.) Karen has been my surrogate mom, even when my mom was still around, and we’ve turned our relationship into a comfortable adult sibling one, although with occasional maternal overtones. So having her there helping out and being support was very valuable.

One thing that she encouraged was for me to get more exercise. I had been in a hospital bed for most of the month of January, with occasional sojourns into the hallways of Stanford Hospital accompanied by an IV pole or two and my trusty HEPA filter. And with the onset of pineapple sized legs, walking was even less of a priority. But at home, Karen encouraged me to start walking with the larger legs.

I’ve come to be amazed by patients who during or immediately after become a participant for Team in Training and start an endurance program. I am just now understanding how difficult this is for a healthy person. How do these people immediately hop out of bed and start doing this stuff? I certainly couldn’t. I came to find out that, even with encouragement from Karen, I could barely waddle my pineapple legs a couple of blocks. And to think that five years and a month later, last Saturday March 17th, I ran 10 miles. Life is interesting.

So, about this first week of February (I remember the time because the Super Bowl was happening about then), several events ended and began. My sister went back to her home in New Orleans about this time. I know it was hard on her to leave, and it was hard on me. And Sam.

And, FINALLY, the pineapple legs left. It was always going to be a relatively temporary condition, they told me, because it was a side effect of the steroids. I had started on them when taking amphoterrible, but after that treatment had run its course and had successful while in the hospital, it was discontinued. However, one can’t immediately stop taking steroids, so I had to continue taking it but taper off of it. After all the steroids had been discontinued, it was a waiting game for the fluid retention to end. They said, keep taking the diuretics, and in a few days it will kick in. “Kick in” meant, basically, the body releasing the retained fluids. They would be released in the normal manner, through the kidneys. So, I was told to expect to go to the bathroom when it kicked in.

After a week of continued pineapple legs after the steroids were stopped, finally one night it hit. I went to the bathroom, did the proverbial #1, and continued. And continued. And continued. It seemed like several minutes. When I woke up the next morning, the legs were mostly normal. It started to become easier to walk. No more hose. I lost weight, but I never really got that Nicole Richie cancer thinness.

That ended the January hospitalization and its effects. Now the continued outpatient chemo treatment and cycles of illness and recuperation in February would begin.



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