History #6 – Diagnosis – December 22, 2001 – Stanford – Biopsy

January 30, 2007 at 5:18 am | Posted in Diagnosis and treatment history, Initial diagnosis of APML, Stanford Hospital, Susie Engard | 1 Comment

 

Early that morning we arrived at the Hematology Clinic for definitive diagnosis of the type of leukemia and to begin initial treatment.

For some reason I can’t recall now, Sam took me to the hospital and left. I can’t recall if he was working days, or he had to sleep for work. But my friend Susie came, and stayed with me that first day.

And it was an interesting day, to say the least. To diagnose the kind of leukemia, they were going to do two tests – one withdrawing blood, and another through bone marrow biopsy. Some of the blood work they could analyze here; other tests would have to be sent over to the University of New Mexico (why there, not really sure to this day) for special chromosomal analysis. They could tell with certainty, however, with the blood test that could be done that morning. So they took blood and began that.

The other test they attempted that morning was a bone marrow biopsy. For those who don’t know, a bone marrow biopsy takes a sample of bone marrow from the hip for analysis. To get marrow from the bone, they use a long needle, shove it through the hip bone (which is fairly close to the skin) and aspirate with a syringe. Sounds simple, right?

The staff there told me that while a little painful, it was more of a more intense quick bee sting. So for pain medication, they gave me a lollipop with medication designed for children, saying that would be all I needed. So, after I’d finished it, the Hematology Fellow came in and attempted to do the aspiration.

What we came to find out was that in my type of leukemia, the marrow produces large numbers of immature cells, multiple times more than is normal. And many of them were in the marrow, making it thicker than normal, and more than could be aspirated. So, the Fellow had difficulty.

Let me expand on that – the Fellow had a LOT of difficulty. While it did hurt some when the needle first went through, that was nothing like what came next. When the Fellow couldn’t aspirate, he would push the needle in further, sort of digging around until he thought he might be able to aspirate, and tried again. He did this several times. It was, uhm, quite painful with all that manipulation, as you might imagine. So not to long after a first attempt the Fellow stopped.

He ordered some type of pill (I think a Valium or something) and we tried again. Same result. We would have to go even stronger.

To be continued…..

 

 

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1 Comment »

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  1. very interesting, but I don’t agree with you
    Idetrorce


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